Turning Point Entertainment Group Online

"Helping independent artists connect the dots"

Archive for November, 2012

Scrumptious Trini Treat

Posted by tpegonline on November 27, 2012

This poem is for the ladies from Trinidad.

This poem is part of my Caribbean Queens Series.

This poem is a series of 29 haiku poems that are strung together in a series to tell a story. I call this style that I created a haiku chain poem. According to Dictionary.com, a haiku is a major form of Japanese verse, written in 17 syllables divided into 3 lines of 5, 7, and 5 syllables, and employing highly evocative allusions and comparisons, often on the subject of nature or one of the seasons; or a poem written in this form.

All of my poems have the title of the poem in the last line of the poem. Also, song titles have been hyperlinked to their respective audio files on GrooveShark.com.

Enjoy!

“Scrumptious Trini Treat”

© 2012 Tyrone Turner

All rights reserved

I remember when
we first met. That was about
13 years ago.

It was so funny
how we met. I was buying
an EPT kit.

It was for my boy,
Troy, but you were on line in
front of me, smiling.

I said, “Hello.” You
said, “Best of luck to you and
to your lady friend.”

I said, “Oh – this is not
for me. It is for my friend –
for his lady friend.”

You asked, “So do you
have a wife or a girlfriend?”
I shook my head “no.”

With that melodic
accent of yours, you giggled,
“Hey, I just met you.

This is crazy. But
here’s my number, so Call Me
Maybe
.” That killed me!

I laughed so dang hard.
Well, I gave you my number
and here we are now.

We made a deal to
Live It Up and stay in a
Ghetto Heaven mode.

Our families get
along well. Southern Soul meets
Trini Soca Charm.

Your younger sisters
are named Jean & Dinah. They
will be fine like you.

Last Night Changed It All.
I really had a ball. Me
and my wife, chilling.

Dinner was great! We
had macaroni pie, ox
tails and callaloo.

We washed our food down
with some sorrel. For dessert
we had sugar cake.

Then you did it, girl.
Cabernet sauvignon is
what we toasted with.

“To Us,” was our toast.
Two beautiful children, a
fine home and nice cars.

Truly blessed and favored.
“Be Thankful For What You Got”
is how we were raised.

Girl, I Want You now.
I’m in the mood. I hope you’re
Feeling Hot Hot Hot.

Kissing You is what
I want to do to you, girl.
Please, mother may I?

You said, “Boy, if you
rub mih back, mih go rub yuh
belly.”
That’s a plan!

Don’t Be Afraid of
me. I am not a Monster.
I am your husband.

You’re Forever Mine
and I am Forever Yours.
Let’s Stay Together.

I’m love drunk off of
you like you’re a big bottle
of strong punch with cream.

I want you to be
happy. In mind, body and
soul. I Adore you.

Is It Good to You?
Just tell me what you want and
I’ll do it for you.

Our love-making is
always good and can never
get old. Truth I speak.

It is better when
the kids aren’t home. We can
freak out like Le Freak.

Finger-lickin’ while
slow lovin’ and rubbin’ my
Scrumptious Trini Treat.

Posted in black art, black romance, poetry, spoken word | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Tasty Mojito

Posted by tpegonline on November 15, 2012

This poem is for the ladies from Cuba.

This poem is a series of 19 haiku poems that are strung together in a series to tell a story. I call this style that I created a haiku chain poem. According to Dictionary.com, a haiku is a major form of Japanese verse, written in 17 syllables divided into 3 lines of 5, 7, and 5 syllables, and employing highly evocative allusions and comparisons, often on the subject of nature or one of the seasons; or a poem written in this form.

All of my poems have the title of the poem in the last line of the poem. Also, song titles have been hyperlinked to their respective audio files on GrooveShark.com.

Enjoy!

“Tasty Mojito”

© 2012 Tyrone Turner

All rights reserved

The largest island
in the Caribbean is
the isle of Cuba.

Aretha Franklin
sang that “There is a rose up
in Spanish Harlem.

I’m going to pick
that rose and watch her as she
grows in my garden.”

Duke Ellington played
and Ella Fitzgerald sang
to Take the “A” Train.

That is what I did.
All the way up to Harlem
where you used to live.

What a beautiful
girl. A cocoa brown skinned
Caribbean queen.

Chocolate-dipped, sweet
treat. Pretty face, smooth skin and
a soft curvy frame.

You’re sweet Azucar
Negra
like her majesty,
Queen Celia Cruz.

When we went to the
Cuban bistro last weekend
we danced All Night Long.

You sang along to
the words of Este Tumbao:
Descarga
. Cuban Jazz.

We dined on arroz
con pollo
as our main course.
It was so damn good!

For dessert we had
capuchinos. They look like
little yellow cones.

I asked if I could
kiss you. You said, “Sí. Para
luego es tarde.”

Ain’t no time like the
present so I went for it.
Sucking on your full lips.

Tracing them with my
tongue and nibbling on your chin.
You exhaled deeply.

The waiter stopped by
to ask us if we wanted
anything to drink.

I declined because
no matter what they put in
a glass or a cup.

Mix it with whiskey,
rum or vodka, you are what
I want to sip on.

Act Like You Know.You
are my drink of choice. Top-shelf,
Tasty Mojito.

Posted in black art, black romance, poetry, spoken word | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Sandy, You Wiped Me Out

Posted by tpegonline on November 13, 2012

This is a 10-part triple rhyme poem that I wrote in reference to the infamous Hurricane Sandy.

This storm displaced me and my family from our home.

I hyperlinked song titles to their respective audio files on GrooveShark.com.

Things could have been worse for me. Make sure that if you’re a homeowner, you have flood insurance. If you’re a renter, get renter’s insurance.

Let me know what you think about this poem.

Thank you.

“Sandy, You Wiped Me Out”

© 2012 Tyrone Turner

All rights reserved.

‘S’ is for the shock I felt when I first learned how furious your wrath was and how my home may have been immersed by the surge.

‘A’ is for the anxiety I felt while I went to check on my apartment and what I saw almost caused my bowels to purge.

‘N’ is for the nausea that overcame me when I smelled the foul stench of rotting food and salt water-drenched furniture made and it put me on the verge.

The verge of throwing up and crying.

My heart sank and I felt like I was dying.

Some say, “Keep your head-up,” but when you’re going through something like this yourself, it isn’t what you’re interested in buying.

‘D’ is for the depression that started to set into my mind because I felt like I was in Hell.

‘Y’ is for the loud scream I let out as it was a painful, frightful yell.

These are lyrics to a sad song that I propel.

It is a sad thing when your life is drenched and placed on the sidewalk for the whole world to see.

This was something that has happened to other people but I never thought it would happen to me.

It is a humbling experience and will put the proudest person on bended knee.

The goddess, Yansan, is the orisha of winds, hurricanes and tempests all of which are devastating and can cause you bumps, bruises and dings.

Don’t attach yourself to material items and fickle concerns because they are at best fleeting things.

Flood waters can make a pauper out of queens and out of kings.

Even though I lost virtually everything I still have my health.

My extended family opened their arms and embraced me to let me know that I’m not by myself.

Some close friends have also said to me, “Brother, you know we be like Monopoly, because if I got it, you got it because we always have shared the wealth.”

When you’re going through something you really get to know who your friends are.

Words are just words but your actions is what takes you far.

Do the right thing by remembering that “a friend in need is a friend indeed” and it can make you shine like a star.

Going from “classy to ashy” in the course of a few hours.

We must remember to never fool with Mother Nature because of her awesome powers.

Your world can come Tumblin Down like the twin towers.

The Sensational Nightingales sang It’s Gonna Rain, but I didn’t think it would affect me.

I thought I would be spared in my little cozy home by the sea.

I just couldn’t imagine that I would be a casualty of the greatest flood in NYC’s history.

You can have it all today with a lot material wealth, fame and clout.

Anything can happen to me or you and in this I have no doubt.

I know this first-hand because Sandy, you wiped me out.

Posted in black art, poetry, religion, spirituality, spoken word | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , | 5 Comments »

Bahama Mama

Posted by tpegonline on November 9, 2012

This poem is for the ladies from the Bahamas.

This poem is a series of 26 haiku poems that are strung together in a series to tell a story. I call this style that I created a haiku chain poem. According to Dictionary.com, a haiku is a major form of Japanese verse, written in 17 syllables divided into 3 lines of 5, 7, and 5 syllables, and employing highly evocative allusions and comparisons, often on the subject of nature or one of the seasons; or a poem written in this form.

All of my poems have the title of the poem in the last line of the poem. Also, song titles have been hyperlinked to their respective audio files on GrooveShark.com.

Enjoy!

“Bahama Mama”

© 2012 Tyrone Turner

All rights reserved.

1492
Christopher Columbus sailed
the deep ocean blue.

He thought that he was
in the Indies but it was
Guanahani isle.

The people on the
isle were Lucayans. A branch
of the Taino.

The Bahamian
flag is a tricolor one
with profound meaning.

Black is for vigor
and force of a united
people. All for one.

Gold is for the sun
and aquamarine is for
the clear, deep blue sea.

I remember the
day we met. Sweetheart, Do You
Remember
that day?

That rainy day in
September when I held the
4 train door for you?

Man, the conductor
was so mad at me because
I held the train door.

I was cool with that.
He didn’t see what I saw.
An ebony goddess.

A dark-skinned beauty
that was kissed by the sun and
made soft to the touch.

You are a treat to
see. If I could not see you,
I’d Rather Go Blind.

I asked you your name.
You told me that you were taught
don’t speak to strangers.

So, I introduced
myself to you so that I
was no longer one.

I gave you my card
and as they say, the rest is
history, my dear.

Just this morning, you
awakened me to the smell
of corned beef and grits.

Some scrambled eggs and
Bahamian Johnny Cakes
on a small side plate.

Damn, girl. What are you
trying to do to me? I
just got out of bed.

Here you are with this
heavy food about to put
me back to sleep, huh?

I’m just joking, my
love. You keep me full and so
very satisfied.

I’m drunk off of how
well you treat me. I’m Dreamin’
about you day and night.

Don’t worry. I’m not
a Drunk Man, but I’m a One
Woman Man
. I’m Yours.

When I was out with
my boys the other night, we
were having a ball.

Laughing and joking
and getting caught up on things.
Swapping work stories.

Paul had a few rounds
of Long Island Iced Tea. Jeff
drank Jack Daniel’s straight.

Guess what I had to
drink? Not Henny. Not rum, but
Bahama Mama.

Posted in black art, black romance, poetry, spoken word | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Countries featured in my “Caribbean Queens Series”

Posted by tpegonline on November 4, 2012

I just finished writing a series of 12 haiku chain poems for my Black and Creole sisters from the Caribbean. Some of the countries are not islands in the Caribbean Sea as they are in Central America or South America, but they are still considered West Indian and/or Blacktinos (i.e., Black Latinos). I tried to give a little history of each country in the poems and possibly discuss the music and cuisine from that particular culture.

Here are the countries that I wrote about (in no particular order or preference):

  1. Guyana
  2. Jamaica
  3. Puerto Rico
  4. Haiti
  5. Belize
  6. Dominican Republic
  7. Barbados
  8. Panama
  9. Bahamas
  10. Cuba
  11. Trinidad & Tobago
  12. Suriname

These poems are to honor my lovely West Indian and Blacktino sisters. I was born in the United States of America, with roots in South Carolina, but at the end of the day, I love and respect all of my sisters. Like the Jungle Brothers and Q-Tip said, Black is Black.

Some have already been posted but stay tuned for more to come.

Tyrone Turner
Coordinator / Promoter / Poet / Author
t: 646.470.3708
e: ty@tpegonline.com


Posted in black art, black romance, poetry, spoken word | Tagged: , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Poetry, Puns & Pipes / “P3”

Posted by tpegonline on November 2, 2012

Hey there, folks.

I’m working to put together an event in early 2013 to feature poets, comedians, and singers/rappers.

I’ll call these events Poetry, Puns & Pipes or “P3” for short.

I’m looking at Tuesday, January 8th, 2013 as a tentative date at a Greenwich Village bar venue.

Please let me know if you’re interested in participating and/or attending an event like this.

Thanks!

Tyrone Turner
Coordinator / Promoter / Poet / Author

Posted in comedy, poetry, spoken word | Leave a Comment »

Black Panama Babe

Posted by tpegonline on November 2, 2012

This poem is for the ladies from Barbados.

This poem is a series of 24 haiku poems that are strung together in a series to tell a story. I call this style that I created a haiku chain poem. According to Dictionary.com, a haiku is a major form of Japanese verse, written in 17 syllables divided into 3 lines of 5, 7, and 5 syllables, and employing highly evocative allusions and comparisons, often on the subject of nature or one of the seasons; or a poem written in this form.

All of my poems have the title of the poem in the last line of the poem. Also, song titles and movie titles have been hyperlinked to their respective audio files on GrooveShark.com and IMDB.com.

Enjoy!

“Black Panama Babe”

© 2012 Tyrone Turner

All rights reserved.

“For the benefit
of the world”
is the motto
of great Panama.

It is also the
truth about you. You’ve made the
world a better place.

There are two on your
flag, but you told me flat-out,
“Baby I’m a Star”.

You told me that you
have Jamaican, Bajan and
Trinny roots. Great-Great

Grands came over to
work on the canal. They chose
to stay and live there.

They met and married
other blacks that were there for
centuries. Escaped

Slaves. They were made to
be slaves. Kidnapped from the land
of our ancestors.

Bayano was a
famous cimarron leader
that led slave revolts.

James Brown used to sing
that “Papa Don’t Take No Mess.”
Bayano did not.

You can cook your butt
off. When you’re in the kitchen
you do miracles.

Food tastes so good it
makes me want to slap mama.
Finger-licking good.

Mmmmmm. The smell of my
favorite dish. The scent of
ropa vieja. Yum!

You are a lot of
woman. Easy on the eyes
and smooth to the touch.

Sweet on the tongue, a
breath of fresh air and music
to my ears. Awesome.

I’m don’t mean to
be fresh, but damn… Tu Pum Pum
Mami, Mami! Whew!

Good Loving day and
night. I always want to sail
your canal zone, girl.

That fly sister
named Melissa de Sousa
es Panameña.

You can ask her the
real deal. Not Taye Diggs, but I’m
The Best Man
. I’m Real.

100%.
I’m Ginuwine when I say
My Whole Life Has Changed.

For the better for
sure. When I first met you, I
had other plans for you.

In my mind I thought
that you’d be a part of my
Entourage.

But you put me in
my place. You let me know that
you’re a lady. Not a

Trick to be toyed with.
Rather a Black Woman to
be loved and pampered.

West Indian and
Spanish accent. I love it!
Black Panama Babe.

Posted in black art, black romance, poetry, spoken word | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »